Avaiation Legislation - Domestic - Cook Islands Ministry of Transport
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Avaiation Legislation – Domestic

Domestic

The Cook Islands has a modern suite of Aviation Legislation which is comprised of primary legislation (Acts) and subordinate legislation (Regulations and Rules).  Key documents are provided here.

Please note that the Pacific Islands Legal Information Institute (PacLII) also provides links to legislation for Pacific Island states.  The PacLII website notes that users of the site should be aware the PacLII databases may not be complete.

Acts

There are a number of major pieces of legislation that are related to the administration of aviation matters:

  • Civil Aviation Act 2002
  • Air Services Act 1984

 

Regulations

 

Rules

The Aviation section is responsible for the administration of the Civil Aviation Act 2002 and the Air Services Act 1984 and associated rules and regulations.

The Minister of Transport establishes the rules that all:

  • pilots
  • engineers
  • aircraft operators
  • airlines
  • air traffic controllers
  • aerodrome operators
  • regulated air cargo agents

follow to keep aviation safe and secure.

The Ministry monitors the implementation of these rules and have the power to take action if they are not followed.

Airspace Hazards

Fireworks, balloons, model aircraft, kites, structures, wires, etc

There are a number of hazards to aviation.

Model aircraft and unmanned aerial systems (UAS)

Lights – searchlights and lasers, if these can adversely affect aircraft safety

Free balloons (pilotless) – 1.5 m3 or greater (party balloons do not require approval

Pyrotechnics – fireworks displays

Moored balloons (kytoons) – 3.0 m3/1.5 m diameter or greater

Reporting an Accident

Ever since the Wright brothers and Richard Pearce flew, aviators have looked at flying accidents and near misses to find out what went wrong, and how they can stop it happening again.

It is critical that accidents and incidents be reported.